ABOUT

Fiona McGregor is a Sydney author and performance artist. She writes novels, essays, articles and reviews, most of which can be accessed here. Since 1993, she has published 5 books. In June 2019, Giramondo will publish her 6th, the photoessay A Novel Idea.

Fiona’s latest novel, Indelible Ink, is a family saga featuring a mother who loses it, finds it, but can’t take it with her. It’s a love/hate song to Sydney, a savage indictment of middle-class conservatism, cultural whiteness and Australian affluenza. Indelible Ink won Age Book of the Year and was shortlisted for other awards. It was published in the UK by Atlantic, and in French translation by Actes-Sud in March 2019.

Fiona’s travel memoir Strange Museums can be purchased here. All her previous books won or were shortlisted for prizes, including the Steele Rudd Award for Suck My Toes. Suck My Toes has been re-issued by Scribe as an ebook entitled Dirt, along with Au Pair.

Forthcoming is a collection of non-fiction going back 25 years, mainly focussed on performance and Sydney’s queer underground. Fiona is also working on a series of novels based on the life of Iris Webber, queer petty criminal active in Sydney’s sly-grog era through the 1930s-1950s.

Fiona’s performance art began with collaborations at alternative parties and events. She moved to a solo practice in 2007, creating work in galleries, at festivals, as interventions and in nature.

Her work tends to the endurance and durational forms, using both video and live actions. You Have the Body, a meditation on unlawful detention, toured Australia and the UK in 2008-09 to wide acclaimed, including being voted Show of the Year by theatre critic James Waites.

From 2008-2011 she created the multidisciplinary Water Series which culminated in a major show at Artspace. Group shows include ‘Performance Presence/Video Time’ at Australian Experimental Art Foundation. In 2016, McGregor performed with American artist Sheree Rose at UNSW Galleries as part of ‘The Patient’, curated by Bec Dean.

Fiona has lived and worked on Borogegal, Birrabirragal and Gadigal land for most of her life. She pays her respects to the traditional owners of these places – part of the Guringai and of the Eora/Darug nations – past, present and emerging.